St. Joseph's Catholic Primary Academy

We Value All in the Name of Jesus the Christ

RSE and the new requirements for 2020

Catholic schools and RSE 2020/2021

Catholic Schools, like all other schools in England are required to produce a written policy following the guidance issued by the Department of Education on Relationships education, relationships and sex edcation (RSE) and health education.  The DfE guidance can be found here.   Catholic schools are required to deliver RSE in accordance with the teaching of the church.  This approach is compatible with the guidance issed by the DfE.

RSE is part of the mission of Catholic schools to educate the whole person.   It should be carried out as part of the holistic education which seeks to form as well as inform young people in preparation for adult life.  (Catholic Education Service)

The statutory implementation for 'Relationships Education' has been delayed till the summer term 2021; due to Covid 19.  When implemented, it will become a statutory  subject for all primary schools and 'Relationships and Sex Education' will become a statutory subject for all secondary schools in England.   

A draft statutory guidance for governing bodies, head teachers, principals, senior leadership teams and teachers was published in February 2019 by the Department for Education.  For Catholic schools, this new curriculum provides challenges and opportunities.  

St Joseph's l is working in partnership with Journey in Love to ensure the school implements a fully compliant Policy for Relationships Education (RSE) from Summer 2021.  These resources are used widely across many Catholic schools in England.  The Catholic Education Service have approved the Journey in Love curriculum content and standard of resources to ensure schools undertake their statutory duty. 

The Governing Board and Senior Leadership team of the school have agreed the RSE Policy.  St Joseph's was guided by the Diocese of Nottingham's Model RSE Policy in order to develop the vision and curriculum for primary RSE.   

Please see the RSE Policy and curriculum documents for your perusal.  If parents/carers wish to discuss any aspects of this curriculum subject content, please feel free to speak to the Headteacher.

 Our scheme

‘A Journey in Love’

(Relationship and Sex Education)

A Journey in Love’ is the RSE scheme (Relationship and Sex Education) that we use at St. Joseph's.  It is a resource created by Sister Jude Groden of BRES. It is the recommended programme of study for Catholic schools for Relationship and Sex Education, and has been written as a progressive scheme of work that supports the Religious Education, PSHE and Science curriculum taught within the school.


As children progress through school, they discover more and more about themselves and the wider world.  This thirst for learning new things in all aspects of life is fostered by the school, who attempt to create a safe, stimulating environment for learning; supporting all children in their development.  Our mission statement which drives the school, attempts to achieve this goal following the Gospel values of truth and respect, understanding our journey as children of God, both special and unique.

Central to our work within our school is learning about our faith, including understanding ourselves, our position in our community and how we develop as human beings - our spiritual, social, emotional and physical development.  This is how ‘A Journey in Love’ fits in to the school’s curriculum.  The scheme permeates through all levels of learning throughout the school.  It focuses on friendship, family, community, relationships and spirituality; a guide to the children’s development as young Catholics.

As you would expect, not all issues related to personal development are covered by the end of Year 6.  The content is age appropriate and is taught with sensitivity, taking into account the children’s level of maturity in regard to the delivery of the lessons.

 As with all aspects of learning, children are naturally curious and many will have questions related to their lessons. Opportunities to discuss questions form part of the lessons and again these are treated with care and understanding. ‘A Journey in Love’ highlights the importance of parental input and children will be told to discuss their lessons at home.

As a parent, you have the right to withdraw your child from Sex Education at any time if you wish to do so however, this is not to be confused with the topics around growing and life cycles within the Science curriculum which is a statutory requirement.

 A Journey in Love programme content

An aspect of the mystery of love is taught in each year group; children are encouraged to marvel at the wonder and beauty of God’s creative love. This is reflected through a series of progressive and developmental tasks, activities and reflections which focus on physical, social, emotional, intellectual and spiritual development.

Parental overview for Journey in Love

Summary Grid for Journey in Love

EYFS - Teaching slides

Y1 - Teaching slides

Y2 - Teaching slides

Y3 - Teaching slides

Y4 - Teaching slides

Y5 - Teaching slides

Y6 - Teaching slides

Children's booklets

Y1 - Children's booklet

Y2 - Children's booklet

Y3 - Children's booklet

Y4 - Children's booklet

Y5 - Children's booklet

Y6 - Children's booklet

Frequently asked questions from the DfE

The DfE have produced key questions and answers for parents to review, please click on the link below to review.

DFE FAQs

Statutory content of RSE in Science

Under the National Curriculum,  the basics of Sex Education fall within the science curriculum. The statutory content requires maintained schools to teach children about human development, including puberty, and reproduction. Please see the DfE Science Programme of Study below which includes specific content for each year group. 

In Key Stage 1, pupils will:

Be introduced to the process of reproduction and growth in animals. They should be introduced to the concepts of reproduction and growth, but not how reproduction occurs

In Key Stage 2, pupils will:

Be taught about different types of reproduction, including sexual and asexual reproduction in plants and sexual reproduction in animals. Pupils should draw a timeline to indicate stages in the growth and development of humans. They should learn about the changes experienced in puberty. 

Statutory requirements of RSE in PHSE

By the end of primary school children should have been taught about:

Families and people who care for me

Pupils should know:

  • that families are important for children growing up because they can give love, security and stability
  • the characteristics of healthy family life, commitment to each other, including in times of difficulty, protection and care for children and other family members, the importance of spending time together and sharing each other’s lives
  • that others’ families, either in school or in the wider world, sometimes look different from their family, but that they should respect those differences and know that other children’s families are also characterised by love and care
  • that stable, caring relationships, which may be of different types, are at the heart of happy families, and are important for children’s security as they grow up
  • that marriage represents a formal and legally recognised commitment of two people to each other which is intended to be lifelong
  • how to recognise if family relationships are making them feel unhappy or unsafe, and how to seek help or advice from others if needed

Marriage in England and Wales is available to both opposite sex and same sex couples. The Marriage (Same Sex Couples) Act 2013 extended marriage to same sex couples in England and Wales. The ceremony through which a couple get married may be civil or religious.

Caring friendships

Pupils should know:

  • how important friendships are in making us feel happy and secure, and how people choose and make friends
  • the characteristics of friendships, including mutual respect, truthfulness, trustworthiness, loyalty, kindness, generosity, trust, sharing interests and experiences and support with problems and difficulties
  • that healthy friendships are positive and welcoming towards others, and do not make others feel lonely or excluded
  • that most friendships have ups and downs, and that these can often be worked through so that the friendship is repaired or even strengthened, and that resorting to violence is never right
  • how to recognise who to trust and who not to trust, how to judge when a friendship is making them feel unhappy or uncomfortable, managing conflict, how to manage these situations and how to seek help or advice from others, if needed

 Respectful relationships

Pupils should know:

  • the importance of respecting others, even when they are very different from them (for example, physically, in character, personality or backgrounds), or make different choices or have different preferences or beliefs
  • practical steps they can take in a range of different contexts to improve or support respectful relationships
  • the conventions of courtesy and manners
  • the importance of self-respect and how this links to their own happiness
  • that in school and in wider society they can expect to be treated with respect by others, and that in turn they should show due respect to others, including those in positions of authority
  • about different types of bullying (including cyberbullying), the impact of bullying, responsibilities of bystanders (primarily reporting bullying to an adult) and how to get help
  • what a stereotype is, and how stereotypes can be unfair, negative or destructive
  • the importance of permission-seeking and giving in relationships with friends, peers and adults

 Online relationships

Pupils should know:

  • that people sometimes behave differently online, including by pretending to be someone they are not
  • that the same principles apply to online relationships as to face-to-face relationships, including the importance of respect for others online including when we are anonymous
  • the rules and principles for keeping safe online, how to recognise risks, harmful content and contact, and how to report them
  • how to critically consider their online friendships and sources of information including awareness of the risks associated with people they have never met
  • how information and data is shared and used online

Being safe

Pupils should know:

  • what sorts of boundaries are appropriate in friendships with peers and others (including in a digital context)
  • about the concept of privacy and the implications of it for both children and adults; including that it is not always right to keep secrets if they relate to being safe
  • that each person’s body belongs to them, and the differences between appropriate and inappropriate or unsafe physical, and other, contact
  • how to respond safely and appropriately to adults they may encounter (in all contexts, including online) whom they do not know
  • how to recognise and report feelings of being unsafe or feeling bad about any adult
  • how to ask for advice or help for themselves or others, and to keep trying until they are heard,
  • how to report concerns or abuse, and the vocabulary and confidence needed to do so
  • where to get advice, for example family, school or other sources

Key documents

Diary dates